Category: Uncategorized

Political Endorsements

Jim McDermott (D) – Washington’s 7th Congressional District U.S. Representative
“Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change. I proposed legislation similar to I-732 at the federal level, and I’m excited to endorse this state initiative and help Washington launch this nation-leading climate policy. Vote Yes on I-732!” (Watch McDermott’s short video.)

George Shultz (R) – Former U.S. Secretary of State, Secretary of the Treasury
“The revenue neutral carbon tax uses the market place to sort out winners and losers and by being revenue neutral sees to it that the revenue generated by the tax goes back to the people. Congratulations on your effort Carbon Washington. You have my support.”

Ron Sims (D) – Former King County Executive
“I strongly support the Carbon Washington revenue-neutral carbon tax ballot measure. It is a bipartisan approach that will reduce carbon emissions, make our state tax code less regressive, and protect manufacturing jobs. We are running out of time to address the growing threat of global climate disruption. Let’s all work together to pass Initiative 732.”

Mark Miloscia (R) – 30th LD State Senator, Candidate for State Auditor, Accountability & Reform Chair
“We need effective, efficient, and ethical environmental policies to address our climate change problems. I am supporting I-732 because science and experience show that it uses the most effective and efficient mechanisms for reducing pollution. As an accountability professional, I appreciate the utilization of proven market-mechanisms rather than using unproven regulations and government programs that waste money. I also support I-732 because it creates a more ethical and balanced tax code rather than just increasing taxes. As State Auditor, I plan to use audits to insure that I-732 and all other environmental programs remain effective and efficient. It is time to take the politics out of the climate change debate—only a robust audit accountability program can help lead the rest of the nation towards common sense solution. Vote Yes on I-732!”

Joe Fitzgibbon (D) – 34th LD State Representative, House Environment Chair

“Please join me in voting Yes on I-732. We have a moral obligation to current and future generations to fight climate change. I-732 takes a critical first step in that fight and also has helped spark a long-overdue conversation about reforming our broken tax structure. I will work with my fellow legislators to take more aggressive steps to move away from fossil fuels in the years ahead, but pricing carbon pollution is an essential first step and can’t wait any longer.”

Steve Litzow (R) – 41st LD State Senator, Early Learning & K-12 Education Chair
“For our children and future generations we need to start the long transition away from fossil fuels and the pollution they create. Pollution damages our air quality, waterways, health, and climate. I-732 creates a market-driven, non-regulatory incentive to reduce pollution without increasing our total tax burden or the size of government. Please join me in supporting this fiscally responsible pollution reduction policy and Vote Yes on 732.”

Gerry Pollet (D) – 46th LD State Representative, Higher Education Committee Vice Chair
“I-732 is not only our best option for our state to take action on climate change, it is our only significant option for the public to ensure we take a major step forward in meeting carbon reduction goals in Washington State. I have reviewed the assumptions behind claims that the initiative will significantly reduce state revenues, and found them to be contrary to the language of the initiative and principles of statutory interpretation.”

Bill Finkbeiner (R) – Former 45th District State Senator, Senate Majority Leader
“I-732 is a fantastic climate policy that all Washingtonians should support this November. As the Republican senate majority leader I strived to develop a philosophical majority to overcome the partisan gridlock and solve big problems. I-732 accomplishes this same goal by using the marketplace, rather than regulations, to reduce pollution and create new jobs and economic growth in our State.”

Sharon Wylie (D) – 49th LD State Representative, Commerce and Gaming Chair, Tech. & Econ. Dev.
“Like many in Washington I have political concerns about how we will raise the new revenue our State needs; but that is a separate battle. We can’t let the politics of money prevent us from acting on climate. This November an opportunity for long over-due action sits before us in I-732. An opportunity to reduce carbon pollution, while making the most progressive change to our tax code in 40 years. We should take that opportunity! – Vote Yes On I-732.”

Cindy Ryu (D) – 32nd LD State Representative, Community Dev Chair, Housing & Tribal Affairs
“I support I-732 as an important first step towards putting a price on carbon, reducing pollution, and protecting our children and future generations from the adverse effects of climate change.”

Judy Clibborn (D) – 41st LD State Representative, House Transportation Chair
“I am endorsing I-732 because it is a pragmatic and progressive approach to address climate change in Washington.  It has been a proven success in British Columbia, our neighbor to the north, which has an economy and ecology similar to ours.  From my long experience in the Legislature, I know that all of the questions about the revenue neutrality of I-732 raised during the session can be addressed by the Legislature after the initiative is passed. Climate change is one of the greatest moral challenges facing our generation. We can’t wait any longer for action. Vote Yes on I-732.”

Jessyn Farrell (D) – 46th LD State Representative, House Transportation Vice Chair
“I support the concept and urgency behind I-732. We must act on climate to protect future generations in a way that safeguards funding for vital services, ensures a just transition for workers and benefits communities of color that are impacted by climate change. I-732 is a good first step towards that goal.”

Jim Moeller (D) – 49th LD State Representative, Transportation, Labor & Workplace Standards, Rules
“Passing I-732 would let Washington state set the national example of putting a price on carbon emissions. Do you want to lower the sales tax by 1%, and make large-scale polluters pay their fair share instead? Do you want to incentivize green energy, while providing a just transition to lower-income families? Are you tired of government gridlock and inaction on this issue? Let’s act on climate now, with the plan that will jump-start our future with clean energy. Let’s make history. Vote YES on I-732.”

Sherry Appleton (D) – 23rd LD State Representative & Chair of Local Government Committee
“I-732 is a worthy policy to put Washington on the road to lessening the effects of pollution, encouraging clean energy while low-income families would benefit from lower taxes!”

Bruce Bassett (D) – Mercer Island Mayor
“Climate action faces both policy and political challenges. This year we have seen many political groups attempt to discourage support for a great climate policy. I am thankful that the experts at the Sightline Institute have provided such an in-depth analysis of I-732 as it is one of the most important policies of our time. Please help me spread the word – Vote Yes on 732!”

Alec Fisken (D) – Former Port of Seattle Commissioner, Candidate for WA State Treasurer
“Sorting through the contenders for political office in a confusing year like 2016 takes a lot of time.  One handy shortcut is the I-732 endorsement list –  that’s where you’ll find the serious, thoughtful candidates who take environmental issues seriously.”

Mike Doherty (D) – Former Clallam County Commissioner
“With the negative impacts of climate change becoming more obvious each month, I-732 is a solid step toward making the polluters pay a fair carbon tax.  While there is a lot of talk about alternatives, I-732 is the only major step forward to action.”

Sharon Nelson (D) – Former Chairman of the Washington Utility Commission and Consumer Reports
“In Washington, we can agree on two things: 1) climate change is bad; and 2) the state’s tax structure is bad as the sales tax burden falls disproportionately on the poor. As a former regulator, I endorse I-732 because it is a simple and effective policy to address climate change similar to what has been working well in British Columbia since 2008.  Unlike more complicated cap and trade regulatory schemes, the policy of I-732 is not susceptible to game playing and loophole making by special interests.  It will stand the test of time and benefit all residents of Washington, especially lower income people.”

Lisa Wellman (D) – Candidate for 41st LD State Senator
“I-732 is our signal to the rest of the country that we take climate change seriously and Washington is taking action. The initiative is a step in the right direction and is a base upon which we can build a stronger even more comprehensive response to the climate challenge.”

Jeff Morris (D) – 40th LD State Representative, Technology & Economic Development Chair

Christine Rolfes (D) – 23rd LD State Senator – Ways & Means, Early Learning & K-12 Education, Rules

Joan McBride (D) – 48th LD State Representative – Environment, Transportation, Local Gov., Rules

Tana Senn (D) – 41st LD State Representative, Early Learning & Human Services Vice Chair

Seth Armstrong (D) – Former 36th LD State Representative

Deb Eddy (D) – Former 48th LD State Representative & Mayor of Kirkland

Mike McGinn (D) – Former Seattle Mayor

Jeff Sanderson – Mercer Island City Council Member

Dennis Higgins – Kent City Council Member

Nick Licata (D) – Former Seattle Council Member

Peter Steinbrueck – Former Seattle Council Member

Jennifer Goulet (D) – Candidate for 9th LD State Representative

Democratic Party Organizations: 5th Legislative District Democrats, 10th Legislative District Democrats, 20th LD Democrats, 26th Legislative District Democrats, 32nd Legislative District Democrats, 40th Legislative District Democrats, 41st Legislative District Democrats, Clallam County Democrats, Kitsap County Democrats, Metropolitan Democratic Club of Seattle, Snohomish County Democrats, Skagit County Democrats, Spokane County Democrats, Whatcom County Democrats, Young Democrats of Clark County,

Organizational Endorsement Highlights

Audubon – Washington

Sustainable Path Foundation Board of Directors

Citizens’ Climate Lobby – National + Chapters

Seattle Electric Vehicle Association

New Progressive Alliance

Interfaith Works Board of Directors

Climate Action Ministry

RE-Sources for Sustainable Communities

Olympic Climate Action

Oregon Climate

Cascadia Climate Action

Climate Action Bainbridge

UW Divest

Washington UU Voices

Individual Endorsement Highlights

  • Howard Behar, former President of Starbucks North America
  • Dr. James Hansen, former Director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies, Adjunct Professor at Columbia University’s Earth Institute (where he directs a program in Climate Science, Awareness and Solutions)
  • Cliff Mass, Meteorologist
  • Edward W. Sheets, President Ed Sheets Consulting, former Executive Director Northwest Power and Conservation Council, and former Director of the Washington State Energy Office
  • A-P Hurd, President, Touchstone
  • Jigar Shah, Co-Founder and President of Generate Capital, Inc., Founder and former CEO of SunEdison
  • Jesse Berst, Chairman, Smart Cities Council 
  • Aaron Fairchild, CEO, Green Canopy Homes
  • Richard Gammon, Emeritus Professor of Chemistry University of Washington, Professor of Oceanography, Adjunct Professor of Atmospheric Sciences, Ph.D. Harvard University, 1970
  • Lars Johansson, CleanTech Angel Investor
  • Rogers Weed, VP of 1Energy Systems and former Director (2009-2012) of the Washington State Department of Commerce
  • James W Murray (Professor), Founding Director UW Program on Climate Change, University of Washington
  • Alan Hardcastle, Sr. Research Manager, Social and Economic Sciences Research Center, Washington State University
  • Charles Komanoff, Executive Director, Carbon Tax Center
  • Dave Kozin, CFO, A&R Solar

Srirup Kumar, President & Co-founder, Community Supported Biocycling

  • Howard Lamb, Founder, Sunergy Systems
  • Bob Lynette, Renewable energy consultant, climate change lecturer and teacher, past Washington Environmental Council Board member
  • Krist Novoselic, Musician | Community Activist
  • Bill Lemon, investment banker, adjunct professor of finance at Pinchot University, and renewable energy investor
  • Mike Marsolek, professor in Environmental Engineering at Seattle University
  • Pete Agtuca, President and Founder of Pacific Air Cargo Transfer Systems, Laser Cutting Northwest, and Three Phase Energy Systems
  • Brian Allen, General Manager,Crowd Energy Ocean Turbines
  • Jan Allen, P.E. CMQ/OE, President, Impact BioEnergy
  • Julie Blazek, AIA, LEED AP, Partner, HKP Architects
  • Patrick Callahan, CEO, Urban Renaissance Group LLC
  • Eric Hull, Co-Founder & General Manager, Banner Power Solutions
  • Harvey Jones, owner, Cooper Jones
  • Aaron Koopman, CEO, VMG Solutions
  • Evan Leonard, Vice President, Artisan Electric
  • Michael J. Smith Jr., Attorney, Business Development Advisor, Impact Bioenergy
  • Deborah Todd, CSBA, LEEDap, Owner, Building Design Services
  • Dan Zasloff, Director of Product Marketing, EnergySavvy
  • Albert Rooks, CEO, Small Planet Supply
  • Jeffrey Morris, Ph.D. – Economics, Sound Resource Management Group, Inc.

For a complete list of our individual and organizational endorsements please visit our website www.yeson732.org/endorsements

Jim McDermott (D) – Washington’s 7th Congressional District U.S. Representative

“Climate change is the biggest market failure of our time. If the United States is to continue to lead and innovate, we must move away from fossil fuels and focus on developing clean, inexpensive, renewable energy sources. A price on carbon is the best policy to promote this change. I proposed legislation similar to I-732 at the federal level, and I’m excited to endorse this state initiative and help Washington launch this nation-leading climate policy. Vote Yes on I-732!” (Watch McDermott’s short video.)

George Shultz (R) – Former U.S. Secretary of State & Secretary of the Treasury

“The revenue neutral carbon tax uses the market place to sort out winners and losers and by being revenue neutral sees to it that the revenue generated by the tax goes back to the people. Congratulations on your effort Carbon Washington. You have my support.”

Ron Sims (D) – Former King County Executive

“I strongly support the Carbon Washington revenue-neutral carbon tax ballot measure. It is a bipartisan approach that will reduce carbon emissions, make our state tax code less regressive, and protect manufacturing jobs. We are running out of time to address the growing threat of global climate disruption. Let’s all work together to pass Initiative 732.”

Sherry Appleton (D) – 23rd LD State Representative & Chair of Local Government Committee

“I-732 is a worthy policy to put Washington on a the road to lessening the effects of pollution and encouraging clean energy, while low-income families would benefit from lower taxes!”

Bruce Bassett (D) – Mercer Island Mayor

“Climate action faces both policy and political challenges. This year we have seen many political groups attempt to discourage support for a great climate policy. I am thankful that the experts at the Sightline Institute have provided such an in-depth analysis of I-732 as it is one of the most important policies of our time. Please help me spread the word – Vote Yes on 732!”

Judy Clibborn (D) – 41st LD State Representative & Chair of Transportation Committee

“I am endorsing I-732 because it is a pragmatic and progressive approach to address climate change in Washington. It has been a proven success in British Columbia, our neighbor to the north, which has an economy and ecology similar to ours. From my long experience in the Legislature, I know that all of the questions about the revenue neutrality of I-732 raised during the session can be addressed by the Legislature after the initiative is passed. Climate change is one of the greatest moral challenges facing our generation. We can’t wait any longer for action. Vote Yes on I-732”

Mike Doherty (D) – Former Clallam County Commissioner

“With the negative impacts of climate change becoming more obvious each month, I-732 is a solid step toward making the polluters pay a fair carbon tax. While there is a lot of talk about alternatives, I-732 is the only major step forward to action.”

Jessyn Farrell (D) – 46th LD State Representative & Vice Chair of Transportation Committee

“I support the concept and urgency behind I-732. We must act on climate to protect future generations in a way that safeguards funding for vital services, ensures a just transition for workers and benefits communities of color that are impacted by climate change. I-732 is a good first step towards that goal.”

Bill Finkbeiner (R) – Former 45th District State Senator & Senate Majority Leader

“I-732 is a fantastic climate policy that all Washingtonians should support this November. As the Republican senate majority leader I strived to develop a philosophical majority to overcome the partisan gridlock and solve big problems. I-732 accomplishes this same goal by using the marketplace, rather than regulations, to reduce pollution and create new jobs and economic growth in our State.”

Alec Fisken (D) – Former Port of Seattle Commissioner & Candidate for WA State Treasure

“Sorting through the contenders for political office in a confusing year like 2016 takes a lot of time. One handy shortcut is the I-732 endorsement list – that’s where you’ll find the serious, thoughtful candidates who take environmental issues seriously.”

Joe Fitzgibbon (D) – 34th LD State Representative & Chair of House Environment Committee

“Please join me in voting Yes on I-732. We have a moral obligation to current and future generations to fight climate change. I-732 takes a critical first step in that fight and also has helped spark a long-overdue conversation about reforming our broken tax structure. I will work with my fellow legislators to take more aggressive steps to move away from fossil fuels in the years ahead, but pricing carbon pollution is an essential first step and can’t wait any longer.”

Steve Litzow (R) – 41st LD State Senator & Chair of Early Learning & K-12 Education Committee

“For our children and future generations we need to start the long transition away from fossil fuels and the pollution they create. Pollution damages our air quality, waterways, health, and climate. I-732 creates a market-driven, non-regulatory incentive to reduce pollution without increasing our total tax burden or the size of government. Please join me in supporting this fiscally responsible pollution reduction policy and Vote Yes on 732.”

Jim Moeller (D) – 49th LD State Representative – Transportation, Labor & Workplace Standards, Rules+

“Passing I-732 would let Washington state set the national example of putting a price on carbon emissions. Do you want to lower the sales tax by 1%, and make large-scale polluters pay their fair share instead? Do you want to incentivize green energy, while providing a just transition to lower-income families? Are you tired of government gridlock and inaction on this issue? Let’s act on climate now, with the plan that will jump-start our future with clean energy. Let’s make history. Vote YES on I-732.”

Sharon Nelson (D) – Former Chairman of the Washington Utility Commission and Consumer Reports

“In Washington, we can agree on two things: 1) climate change is bad; and 2) the state’s tax structure is bad as the sales tax burden falls disproportionately on the poor. As a former regulator, I endorse I-732 because it is a simple and effective policy to address climate change similar to what has been working well in British Columbia since 2008. Unlike more complicated cap and trade regulatory schemes, the policy of I-732 is not susceptible to game playing and loophole making by special interests. It will stand the test of time and benefit all residents of Washington, especially lower income people.

Gerry Pollet (D) – 46th LD State Representative & Vice Chair of Higher Education Committee

“I-732 is not only our best option for our state to take action on climate change, it is our only significant option for the public to ensure we take a major step forward in meeting carbon reduction goals in Washington State. I have reviewed the assumptions behind claims that the initiative will significantly reduce state revenues, and found them to be contrary to the language of the initiative and principles of statutory interpretation.”

Cindy Ryu (D) – 32nd LD State Representative & Chair of Community Dev., Housing & Tribal Affairs

“I support I-732 as an important first step towards putting a price on carbon, reducing pollution, and protecting our children and future generations from the adverse effects of climate change.”

Sharon Wylie (D) – 49th LD State Representative & Chair of Commerce and Gaming, Tech. & Econ. Dev.

“Like many in Washington I have political concerns about how we will raise the new revenue our State needs; but that is a separate battle. We can’t let the politics of money prevent us from acting on climate. This November an opportunity for long over-due action sits before us in I-732. An opportunity to reduce carbon pollution, while making the most progressive change to our tax code in 40 years. We should take that opportunity! – Vote Yes On I-732.”

Lisa Wellman (D) – Candidate for 41st LD State Senator

“I-732 is our signal to the rest of the country that we take climate change seriously and Washington is taking action. The initiative is a step in the right direction and is a base upon which we can build a stronger even more comprehensive response to the climate challenge.”

Mike McGinn (D) – Former Seattle Mayor

Christine Rolfes (D) – 23rd LD State Senator – Ways & Means, Early Learning & K-12 Education, Rules

Jeff Morris (D) – 40th LD State Representative & Chair of Technology & Economic Development

Joan McBride (D) – 48th LD State Representative – Environment, Transportation, Local Gov., Rules

Tana Senn (D) – 41st LD State Representative & Vice Chair of Early Learning & Human Services

Seth Armstrong (D) – Former 36th LD State Representative

Deb Eddy (D) – Former 48th LD State Representative & Mayor of Kirkland

Jeff Sanderson – Mercer Island City Council Member

Dennis Higgins – Kent City Council Member

Nick Licata (D) – Former Seattle Council Member

Peter Steinbrueck – Former Seattle Council Member

Arun Jhaveri (D) – Candidate for 7th Congressional District

Jennifer Goulet (D) – Candidate for 9th LD State Representative

Democratic Party Organizations: 20th LD Democrats, 5th Legislative District Democrats, 10th Legislative District Democrats, 26th Legislative District Democrats, 32nd Legislative District Democrats, 40th Legislative District Democrats, 41st Legislative District Democrats, Clallam County Democrats, Kitsap County Democrats, Metropolitan Democratic Club of Seattle, Snohomish County Democrats, Skagit County Democrats, Spokane County Democrats, Whatcom County Democrats, Young Democrats of Clark County,

Over the past several weeks, we have received a lot of questions and complaints about various Public Utility Districts (PUDs) that have been distributing printed and online material regarding their opposition to Initiative 732. While it seems strange to many of you that a public utility can use ratepayer money to try to influence a political campaign, our state law, RCW 42.17A.555, does allow for this practice. A public utility commission can voice its opposition to an initiative, so long as they pass a public resolution and provide equal opportunity for the expression of both viewpoints.

RCW 42.20.040 does prohibit public officials from knowingly distributing a false report — so do keep sending us copies of any mailers or postings you receive, especially if you think there is purposefully misleading information. While utilities are allowed to distribute information about the policy, as well as their opinion, many of their statements do not seem to offer a balanced or complete description of the policy in I-732. We believe the intent of the law is to allow the utility to distribute balanced information and an opinion — not one-sided and partial descriptions of a policy proposal.

Some particular concerns include:

  • It is one-sided to specifically talk about the carbon tax increase on utility customers while making no mention of the corresponding reductions in sales tax, B&O tax, and the Working Family Tax Rebate that I-732 will create.
  • The cost to utility customers should be presented by quoting the rate impact (Cents/KWh) not aggregate dollars. Customers can relate to rate changes far easier than aggregate dollar figures, which appear to be utilized for shock value rather than informational purposes.
  • If aggregate tax figures are presented, then the message should also include the aggregate sales tax savings customers within their territory can expect from the passage of I-732.
  • Many utilities are quoting costs based on an analysis completed by the Washington PUD association. It assumes a rule-making process will increase the emission factor of non-declared electricity from the 1 metric ton of carbon per MWh (defined in section 7 of the legal language of I-732) to a value 18% higher to match other existing laws. If a public utility is distributing a cost estimate to its customers, it should be based on the legal language of the policy, not a hypothetical future change to the policy. This will avoid distributing incorrect information.
  • Information distributed using public funds should be based on the state’s description of the policy, I-732’s legal language, official data sources, and the public meeting. They should not include campaign slogans or canned messages distributed by opposition organizations seeking to expand their reach using Public Utility Districts as free megaphones.
  • Many utilities are quoting an outdated fiscal analysis indicating the passage of I-732 will decrease state revenue by $914M over 4 years. If a description of the state revenue analysis is included the most current OFM estimate of $797M over 6 years should be quoted. It should also cite the I-732 campaign’s official disagreement with the OFM assumptions. Including that one third of this projected tax decrease is based on the assumption that all non-declared electricity will be declared on the first day of implementation; something many PUD’s disagree with in the very same public statement.
  • Some utilities are making statements that a carbon tax would not reduce carbon pollution. This is false, as there is clear empirical evidence from numerous studies that a similar price on carbon has created significant reductions in CO2 since implemented in British Columbia. Additionally both Regional Economic Models, INC (REMI) and the Northwest Power and Conservation Council modeled similar carbon taxes and determined it would create significant reductions in carbon emissions in Washington — including reductions in the electric sector.
  • No utilities have contacted CarbonWA in advance of holding a public meeting, which we believe would be an appropriate good faith effort to achieve equal representation of the issue.

To our concerned supporters, we urge you to not lash out at your utilities because of their position. Just inform us if you think they are distributing false information. If you wish to provide a critique, please do so in a constructive and professional manner — everyone is entitled to their opinion.

We are all disappointed that many of our cleanest utilities, who will pay the least carbon tax of any energy providers in our state, have failed to recognize the competitive advantage I-732 creates for them. Instead, many have joined the predictable position of other energy providers opposing any tax on the product they sell. We hope PUDs will do a better job in the future to avoid promoting the misconception that their customers will have less money in their pocket because of I-732, when in reality most PUD customers likely come out financially ahead, not behind, due to this tax swap.

Rather than lashing out, a more constructive message to send your utility might be: Please reconsider your opposition to I-732. As your customer I am happy to pay more for electricity while paying less for everything else that is exposed to the state sales tax. More importantly, I believe it is essential that we pass an economy-wide price on carbon so the dirtiest polluters in our state are motivated to change their behavior and stop damaging the health and well-being of our children and future generations.

The cost of climate change is expected to reach $3.8 billion per year in Washington by 2020. These include cost that will directly affect utilities including: $150M in reduced hydropower generation, and $44M in increased transmission costs due to higher temperatures. The cost of inaction that your commission and other energy companies are promoting will create massive damage to our society, damage that can be reduced in a cost-effective manner by passing Initiative 732. I would appreciate your including the cost of inaction in any future information you distribute on this topic and hope you re-consider your position on I-732.

A Revenue-Neutral Carbon Tax Ballot Measure Campaign for Washington State

YESON732.ORG  |  EVENTS  |  MEET THE TEAM  |  DONATE

Hello carbon tax friends: If this is your first email newsletter, welcome, and be sure to check out yeson732.org, visit our FAQ page, or join a chapter near you to be a part of the movement!

Let’s be real for a minute. We keep hearing from politically connected folks within the liberal community that they can’t actively support I-732 because the polling isn’t good enough, or that our scrappy new organization isn’t big and strong enough to get it done. We’ve got two messages for the fence sitters and opponents that want to see climate action but are afraid of making the leap with I-732.

  1. Look harder at the data.

    With a simple explanation — not even a tailored campaign message(!), but a simple explanation about what I-732 does — support among voters increases by 20% in Eastern Washington (to over 50%), and by 14% in Seattle (to over 70%) – multiple polls on I-732 demonstrate this trend. For every voter that reads the voters guide, looks at 1 flyer, receives a phone call from a volunteer, or hears about I-732 on the news their odds of supporting our effort radically increase. The electorate is ready to do something about climate change, we just have to connect the dots to I-732.

    So for anyone keeping score at home, polling shows 732 starting out in the 40’s (with a bunch of folks undecided), then rising above 60% with simple messaging, and in the end its at a statistical dead heat around 50% with equal pro/con messaging. For the big time political junkies here’s a FUN FACT: I-732 polls better than Jay Inslee and Bill Bryant are right now, better than R74 (marriage equality) was in some of its polls in 2012, and better then both Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

  2. Help us win or get out of the way, because we are doing this. It’s on.

    This moment demands courage. The climate change alarm bells are ringing as loud as they possibly can – and we are faced with a choice. We can agonize over polling numbers, get lost in battles over policy minutia, and forestall action even longer as climate change gets worse or we can fight as hard as we possibly can for a game changing initiative. 

    We made our choice when we started this campaign. Thousands of you in your generous support made that choice with us. We’ve got to finish our work now. We have to make that choice again and commit to 5 months of hard, fun campaigning for a livable future. Join us with your time as a volunteer, your financial gifts, or both.

    If you are in Seattle, you can sign up right now to join us for a field event. If you are elsewhere in the state, you can contact your local chapter to plug in or just start by walking your neighborhood. Short on time? Make a financial gift to help us hire fellows and staff to deliver the messages to voters you don’t have time to. We are in nothing less than an epic race to reduce emissions before the worst climate impacts hit home, and we are asking you to join the team trying to do something big to reduce emissions right now.

    Don’t wait any longer. Don’t sit on the fence. Don’t wring your hands. Join us. Let’s win.

$20+ gift NOW gets you the first YARD SIGNS! 

Now that we’ve made the clarion call to action, we can take a moment to give thanks to everyone who generously gave to our match (and extra thanks to those that signed up to be a monthly donor). But, for those that haven’t given lately and those that may be able to give again – we’ve got a special gift for everyone who donates between now and June 10th.

We are gearing up to order our first batch of yard signs – the first order will probably be a small run (we are also paying extra for biodegradable ones). Anyone who donates $20 or more will get one of the first yard signs, featuring the new I-732 seal at the top of our email blast! Just give $20 or more on our website and send [email protected] an email with the subject “yard sign” and we will set one aside for you.

If you aren’t in a position to give, find someone to donate on your behalf or join us for some door knocking! Our second order will be set aside for our active volunteers.

Endorsements

We are excited to announce new endorsements (and we have some more big ones pending so stay tuned!).

  1. Clallam County Democrats
  2. Mike Tidwell, Director Chesapeake Climate Action Network: “Carbon Washington’s groundbreaking effort to put a price on carbon — in a revenue neutral way — is an inspiration to climate activists nationwide. In fact, a carbon tax initiative in Washington, DC — with a 100% rebate to citizens — is now gaining steam thanks in part to all the great progress of Carbon Washington. Keep up the great work.”

In the (KING 5) News…

Check out this fantastic spot in King 5 NEWS featuring Ben Silesky and top UW volunteers Aaron Tam and Mishu Pham Whipple. This is the kind of piece that turns votes, and we are rolling them out every week. 

Volunteer Spot

Volunteer of the week is UW student Mishu Pham Whipple – Mishu is about to head out to Sasquatch Music Festival to register and educate voters about I-732. She gathered tons of signatures last year and she just won the UW career center “Huskies Can Do” contest for her work with CarbonWA. No more sitting, waiting, and wishing for someone else to do something big about climate change for Mishu. She is doing it. Let’s join her. Rock on Mishu!

Our ‘wish list’

We are growing our operation, adding staff and a second physical space. We need laptops and computers. Can you part with a working laptop or desktop for 5 months? Or even for a shorter period? Each donated computer is like donating $200 to our campaign, so please email [email protected] if you can make it happen.

Let’s win!

Kyle and the Yes on 732 team

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MEDIA STATEMENT

Kids outside courtroomCarbon Washington, the sponsor of carbon tax Initiative 732, unequivocally supports King County Superior Court Judge Hollis Hill’s ruling that the threat of climate change is so urgent that the state must be placed on a court-ordered deadline to hold polluters accountable now. We also applaud the eight youth plaintiffs whose brave and convincing testimony led to this historic ruling.

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Why Voters Should Support I-732

Initiative 732 is an important first step to reducing pollution, making our tax code more fair, protecting low- and middle-income families, and enabling our state to prosper in a low-carbon future.

I-732 is based on a proven approach to reducing carbon emissions. Similar policies have been implemented successfully in British Columbia and elsewhere around the world. With I-732, we have an opportunity to pass the most effective climate policy anywhere in the country. At the same time, we’ll be implementing what may be the biggest anti-poverty measure in the state since the sales tax exemption for grocery store food was approved in 1977. If we don’t pass I-732 now, we may wait years before our state takes any action on climate change.

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New to 732? We’ve been gearing up for our ballot push and have already been meeting hundreds of new carbon tax friends. So, if this is your first email newsletter, be sure to check out our website (yeson732.org), visit our FAQ page, and join a chapter near you to be a part of our movement.

Hello carbon tax friends: The theme of this week’s email blast is “it’s time to move on, it’s time to get going”, inspired by the Tom Petty song “Time to Move On” currently resonating against the walls of our office. Before we dig in, take this final reminder about our Seattle kickoff and RSVP NOW FOR OUR APRIL 9 KICKOFF BREAKFAST!

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Write to the senator and two representatives from your own legislative district. Mail your letter to Carbon Washington at PO Box 85565, Seattle WA 98145 (or via email [email protected]). We will make sure your letters get delivered to Olympia in a timely way.

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Read a column by two Carbon Washington leaders in the Bellingham Business Journal

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