Campaign News

Hello carbon tax friends: We’re five weeks from qualifying I-732… see the signature countdown below, plus a thank you to our financial contributors and lots of good readings!

Signature count-down

Our goal is 330,000 signatures, and last week we were at 282,735. We are now at 294,862, so we’ve got 35,138 left to go… and you know the drill: check the signature-gathering calendars (in particular here’s Seattle RSVP and Bellevue RSVP forms), share our signature-gathering job postings with students and others who need a bit of cash, connect with us on Facebook and Twitter, volunteer to make phone calls from your home or help out around the campaign office or do data entry from home, help with your local chapter, etc. Special note: Next week we will be doing our end-of-the-month tally and 250 Club updates for October, so take your signature pages to your Halloween parties and then turn in or mail in your signatures on Monday!

A note to financial contributors

We’ve been remiss in thanking the over 1000 people (!) who have donated money to the campaign, but of course without you we wouldn’t be able to pay staff or print signature pages or keep our operations going. So: In the next few weeks we’re going to post a simple thank-you list for donors that’s similar to the 250 Club for signature-gatherers: names of donors who have given $0.01 – $100, $100-$250, $250-$1,000, $1,000-$10,000, and $10,000+. Now, we know that not everybody wants to be publicly recognized, but we also know that all donations are already a matter of public record because of our Public Disclosure reports, so what we’re going to do is offer an “opt-out”: If you have donated to the campaign and would prefer to be listed as Anonymous for the purposes of this public recognition blog post, please just email me and tell me your name. (Ditto if you want to be listed in a way that’s different than the name that what was on your check or your credit card contribution.) And BTW if you want to know how much you’ve contributed total we’re happy to tell you that too, but please note that it may take a week or so to get back to you because we’re still focused on collecting signatures.

Readings

Our signature turn-in made KUOW and the AP, and CarbonWA is even making waves over in Montana, where the fate of PSE’s Colstrip plant is suddenly up for discussion after decades of head-in-the-sands business-as-usual. Sam Deal has a fine opinion piece in the EWU Easterner on “Potential tax on carbon emissions” and here’s a great blog post supporting I-732 from A&R Solar. See also Americans Have Never Been So Sure About Climate Change—Even Republicans in Bloomberg Business. And here’s national polling on public acceptance of global warming. And here’s more on Bill Gates in the Atlantic. Nature has a fine article on “Price carbon — I will if you will” and Adele Morris of the Brookings Institution calls on the IPCC to produce a special report on carbon pricing, quoting new IPCC chair Dr. Hoesung Lee: “If you ask me to choose the most important work in climate change issues, then I’ll choose carbon price. That’s because it is the driver to put us into the right track.” (See also this fine policy overview from the Christian Science Monitor.) Elsewhere: A few folks wrote in to say how much they liked this nifty video explaining the basics of carbon pricing, so I figured I would mention it again, with kudos to our fellow carbon pricing advocates at the Climate Action Business Association in Massachusetts. (See also this article on carbon pricing legislation in Massachusetts.) Finally here’s an article about the measures on the ballot this coming Tuesday; note that Paul Allen &co spent over $1.3 million on signature-gathering to qualify I-1401 (anti-poaching) for the ballot. (We’re on the verge of qualifying for the ballot for less than half that!)

As always, comments are welcome on the blog, or via Facebook or Twitter, and please send your Tales from the Trails, good or bad, to me at yoram@carbonwa.org (please cc: communications@carbonwa.org if you can).

Comments ( 1 )

Leave A Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *